Kite Line
outcast0:

Okay, so this show is amazing. Its more than meets the eye, this shows main theme is childhood, it will hit your childhood core perfectly. Clarence and his friends play pine cone wars, play in fast food play sets, ride bike pegs, deal with parents divorcing, its exactly to a T what our generation went through and did as children. This show will make you remember everything you did as a child and make you wish you could do it all over again.

outcast0:

Okay, so this show is amazing. Its more than meets the eye, this shows main theme is childhood, it will hit your childhood core perfectly. Clarence and his friends play pine cone wars, play in fast food play sets, ride bike pegs, deal with parents divorcing, its exactly to a T what our generation went through and did as children. This show will make you remember everything you did as a child and make you wish you could do it all over again.

lord-lethargy:

I’m selling these things.
fmtownsmarty:

http://i.imgur.com/FGm8ZoD.png
obscurevideogames:

iS: Internal Section (Square - PSX - 1999) 
This “tube shooter” is sometimes compared to Rez, but it came out two years before (and only in Japan). It’s a superficial comparision though. Mainly it’s the art style and thumping breakbeat techno that’s similar; the games feel and play a bit differently. I really enjoyed it (especially the puzzle-solving parts) and I highly recommend hunting it down. And, in case you’re wondering, pretty much everything is in English — not that you really need it in this kind of game.

obscurevideogames:

iS: Internal Section (Square - PSX - 1999) 

This “tube shooter” is sometimes compared to Rez, but it came out two years before (and only in Japan). It’s a superficial comparision though. Mainly it’s the art style and thumping breakbeat techno that’s similar; the games feel and play a bit differently. I really enjoyed it (especially the puzzle-solving parts) and I highly recommend hunting it down. And, in case you’re wondering, pretty much everything is in English — not that you really need it in this kind of game.

abobobo:

restinpeaches:

tamagotchi sonic is so cute omg

Sega Saturn de Hakken!! Tamagotchi Park (Sega Saturn). Ancient, 1998.

mackaroon:

Please please let there be an orchid mantis fairy/bug evolution for scyther!!
I made my own version but I’m really hoping for this to happen!  Or at least a fairy/bug type.  My guy needs a name though!  Something that starts with “Sc” and ends in “r”.  If anyone has any good ideas, lemme know.  The best I have is Scapier, some kind of edit or rapier or something.  I’d love to name it after a neat magical weapon though but I don’t know much about that!
EDITSomeone suggested Scalibur (like Excalibur) and I think that’s what I’ll go with!  Silent “c” though!  (maybe silent “c”? idk really)
A perfect name wow

mackaroon:

Please please let there be an orchid mantis fairy/bug evolution for scyther!!

I made my own version but I’m really hoping for this to happen!  Or at least a fairy/bug type.  My guy needs a name though!  Something that starts with “Sc” and ends in “r”.  If anyone has any good ideas, lemme know.  The best I have is Scapier, some kind of edit or rapier or something.  I’d love to name it after a neat magical weapon though but I don’t know much about that!

EDIT
Someone suggested Scalibur (like Excalibur) and I think that’s what I’ll go with!  Silent “c” though!  (maybe silent “c”? idk really)

A perfect name wow

How did you learn how to code with Unity? Did you take lessons or did you just watch tutorials online?

fantabulosogamedev:

Well, I originally started off taking lessons.  The problem with lessons, however, is that they very often end up just being “monkey see, monkey do” without any actual learning occurring.  As such, I decided to go down a different method of education: set a goal and then attempt to achieve it.

For example, my first goal I set was a simple alarm project.  I wanted to make it so that there was a door that closed when the player got too close, and would only stay open if they went and pushed a button in the room.  One the player pushed this button, the door would no longer close, and they would win the “game.”  Extremely simple, but also extremely valuable.  

This basic project provided the groundwork for a number of different important aspects of Unity, covering Triggers, Animations, interacting with the world, player movement, and quite likely a few more things that are so essential that I take my knowledge of them for granted.  It’s a beautiful project for any beginner in Unity, especially if you go on and make your own twist on it — make a maze after you open the door, or require the player to push buttons in a certain order, or any number of little tweaks that further learning.

From there, I did the same thing, except with more and more complex projects.  ”How do I make collectibles?”  ”How do I make a 2D platformer?” “How do I respawn the player?”  ”How do I have bosses?”  ”How do I implement saving?” — I’m going to be working on that last one very shortly!

As a matter of fact, Le Fantabulous Game is just me doing that entire process within a single project, refining things as I go along.  Bosses, health, conditional respawning, custom GUI, sophisticated triggers, level switching, and plenty of other things, I’ve ALL learned from developing this one game.

So basically, to answer your original question, I’m sort of self-taught.  I decide “Hey, I want to do this!” and use online resources to help me figure out how to do whatever it is.  That’s really the best way to learn programming, in my opinion, and traditional sit-down lessons tend to do nothing but bore and confuse the students.